THE DEVELOPMENT
OVERVIEW
Welcome to 14 Cavendish Square. A contemporary office space from 1770. An opportunity to pre-let a remarkable central London head-quarters ready to be tailored to your needs.

Built at the height of London’s Georgian era, on one of its grandest sites, no.14’s Portland stone façade has graced the north face of Cavendish Square for 250 years.

The Grade II listed building will provide over 7,000 sq ft of net internal Grade A office space, as well as the option of a separately-accessed studio in the Mews of 1,205 sq ft at the rear.

A refined scheme has been prepared, offering the unique combination of grand Georgian rooms looking south over the trees of the Square at the front, and modern open-plan offices behind, with three outdoor spaces.

14 CAVENDISH SQUARE FACADE
Palladian DETAIL
SEEN FROM CAVENDISH SQUARE

“To spend time in this building, to sit beneath its soaring ceilings, to watch the passing of sunlight through the day, the leaves through the year, knowing that all London has to offer is just outside the door, is an incredible experience.”

William Smalley, Architect
(House & Garden's top 100 designers, 2020)

14 CAVENDISH SQUARE FACADE
SEEN FROM CAVENDISH SQUARE

Each of the building’s five floors have been carefully stripped to their core in anticipation of the proposed scheme of works. This has revealed a rich patina of history as well as the graceful proportions of the existing interiors. The rawness of broken plaster walls and ceilings, exposed stone floors and open space, provide a canvas of unique potential for the impending development.

Current entrance hall

A commitment to quality and sophisticated design runs throughout the proposed scheme, in a palette of natural materials, tactile and expressive of quality.

For 14 Cavendish Square, architect Walker Bushe’s commitment to elegant and sustainable modern architecture has been coupled with William Smalley’s refined sensibility. Together, they have produced a scheme of works which will revitalise the listed building.

In the scheme, an elegance of line provides continuity between the Georgian original, the 1950s reconstruction, and modern insertions.

“To spend time in this building, to sit beneath its soaring ceilings, to watch the passing of sunlight through the day, the leaves through the year, knowing that all London has to offer is just outside the door, is an incredible experience.”
WilliAm smalley, architect
(House & Garden's Top 100 Designers, 2020)
Entrance hall
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Visualisation

Taking inspiration from the materiality of the original building, a harmonious contemporary material palette has been curated, in natural stone and brass tones.

Material palette
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PATINATED BRONZE, PORTLAND STONE, PATINATED BRASS, VENETIAN POLISHED PLASTER, CERAMIC TILE, OAK PANELING
The Square:
History & Future

London’s garden squares are its greatest architectural legacy. A living record of London’s history, 14 Cavendish Square spans the story of modern London, from the early eighteenth century to the present day.

14 cavendish square
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View from cavendish square
Cavendish Square, 1813
LITHOGRAPHS

The building was developed as one of four mansions by Sir George Foster Tufnell in 1770, and was built in two pairs, each boasting a grand order of Corinthian pilasters beneath matching pediments. Together they form one of London’s great architectural façades.

Having sustained bomb damage during the Second World War, the rear of the buildings were carefully rebuilt in the early 1950s, during which they were connected by a graceful arch over Dean’s Mews which runs between them. One of the city’s finest public sculptures, Jacob Epstein’s Madonna and Child (1950-52), was commissioned to adorn the archway.

Plans have recently been approved for the modern car park under the Square to undergo a £200 million redevelopment into a luxury shopping and wellness centre, continuing its history into the twenty-first century.

JACOB EPSTEIN, MADONNA AND CHILD, 1950-52
Cast in lead

Jacob Epstein’s Madonna and Child, 1950-52 was commissioned to hang over Dean’s Mews facing Cavendish Square. It was cast from no.14’s roofing lead, recovered as a result of bomb damage to the rear of the building sustained during the Second World War.

CAVENDISH SQUARE REEF GROUP REDEVELOPMENT
CAVENDISH SQUARE ITSELF IS SET TO BE TRANSFORMED WITH A £200 MILLION SUBTERRANEAN REDEVELOPMENT BY THE REEF GROUP.

Images Courtesy of the Reef Group

Currently home to an underground car park servicing Cavendish Square, the Square itself is set to be transformed with a £200 million subterranean redevelopment by the Reef Group.

Housing wellness and healthcare facilities, alongside shopping and leisure spaces, the four-storey underground development will make the space “one of London’s premier public destinations for businesspeople, visitors and local residents to enjoy”.

This, alongside the further redevelopment of neighbouring buildings, is set to transform the immediate area into an ultra-contemporary hub for business, finance, design, medicine, and high-end retail.

Floorplans
Location

Cavendish Square, one of London’s grandest Georgian squares, is perfectly placed for Mayfair and Marylebone, Soho and Bloomsbury, with Harley Street running north towards Regent’s Park, and Oxford Street just to the south.

14 Cavendish Square
SEEN FROM CAVENDISH SQUARE GARDENS

14 Cavendish Square is particularly well located. It borders Mayfair and Marylebone, Fitzrovia and Soho, and can claim culturally esteemed institutions as its neighbours: Wigmore Hall and The Wallace Collection; Chiltern Firehouse Hotel and Claridge’s Hotel; Liberty and Selfridges. The building is within light walking distance of both Bond Street and Oxford Street underground stations, as well as the new Crossrail Bond Street Station that will serve the Elizabeth Line.

Chiltern Firehouse Hotel
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14 CAVENDISH SQUARE, LONDON W1G 9HA
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